Monthly Archives: December 2013

Call for applications:Intel Engineering Internship programme

This is a 12 month fixed term internship suitable for students currently studying towards a Bachelors or Master’s degree in a relevant field. The focus of this role is to implement and execute projects and programs in a timely manner and engage all stakeholders in a proactive manner; flawlessly manage customer quality issues to closure, manage customer satisfaction with product quality and technical support.

In this position, you will be working with the team in the delivery of customer support in the area of focus – such as our consumers/1st time buyers program as well engineering support for customers in Nigeria and West Africa (Ghana) region. The customer support consists of both reactive issue resolution and pro-active improvement projects. Your responsibilities will include but not be limited to:
– Supporting customers with Quality and/or Reliability issues or concerns, including information requests.
– Working on several improvement projects, including customer improvement projects as well as internal improvement projects, such as tools development (programming skills would be an advantage).
– Support for our 1country project and liaising with both internal and external stakeholders to ensure smooth program implementation and delivery.
– Assisting with ‘Keeping The Business Running’ and generally assisting the team in program delivery and implementation.

Qualifications

This is a 12 month fixed-term placement suitable for students currently studying a degree course in relevant disciplines, and is targeted at 2nd or 3rd year students enrolled in a 4 years bachelor’s degree which includes a year in industry. Having one or more of the skills below will be a strong advantage:

Marketing and Sales: Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.

Technical Skills:
– Understanding of basic PC architecture
– Ability to build and debug typical PC hardware, install and debug typical PC operating systems including both Microsoft Windows and various distributions of Linux
– Ability to do circuit designs using large scale integration components, familiarity with configuration of complex devices at register level
– Ability to program in assembly language for X86 processors
– Ability to program in either C or C++, detailed knowledge of communication protocols such as TCP/IP
– Ability to debug electronic circuits using typical debug tools such as oscilloscope, logic analyzer etc
– Project management and implementation

Soft Skills:

– Ability to quickly learn about new products and technologies
– Excellent spoken and written communication skills in English
– Capable of working unsupervised by prioritizing work and focusing on meeting agreed objectives in required timeframe
– Ability to integrate quickly with existing team so that maximum contribution to team goals can be quickly achieved

Job Category

: Engineering

Primary Location

: Nigeria, Lagos

Full/Part Time

: Full Time

Job Type

: Student/Intern

Term:Temporary

Deadline:Jan 18, 2014

About Intel: Intel’s Sales and Marketing group provides world-class support at the OEM, developer and end-user levels. In addition, the group is involved in Internet and e-Commerce strategies, as well as the execution of worldwide Intel® architecture branded product strategies. Intel’s expanding breadth of products and recent acquisitions are providing vast opportunities in Sales and Marketing now and in the future for both the technical and business-oriented.
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Call for Applications: Youth RISE’s International Working Group in 2014

youth particaptionYouth RISE brings together a new group of
young harm reduction and drug policy activists, drug users and young people affected by drug policy from around the world to join our International Working Group (IWG). The IWG play a vital role in the work of Youth RISE delivering vital elements of organisations work to ensure Youth RISE is effectively representing young people who use drugs and that the organisation is communicating the needs of young people who use drugs from around the world.

The IWG members, along with the coordinators, take major decisions
regarding work plans, advocacy, and strategic planning for the network. The IWG also provide regional representation, experience, guidance and support to Youth RISE enabling it to achieve its goals as well as helping develop the infrastructure needed for the sustainability of the Youth RISE network.

If you would like to be an IWG member for 2014, please read the the terms
of reference carefully and see if the role is suited to you.

Please fill in and return the application form below to
info@youthrise.org.
If you have any questions about the International Working Group, please
email robin@youthrise.org

The application process to become an International Working Group Member is now open and closes at 17.00 GMT on the 14th of January.

Call for Applications:The Carrington Youth Fellowship Initiative (CYFI) 2014

US embasy

The Carrington Youth Fellowship Initiative (CYFI) seeks to develop a select group of young Nigerians into ethical and impactful leaders by connecting them with mentorship, networking, training and funding opportunities over the course of an intensive fellowship year. The CYFI fellowship is built around year-long social innovation projects that are designed by fellows and supported by the U.S. Consulate and private partners. Following successful completion of their projects, fellows remain involved with CYFI and the U.S. Consulate through the CYFI Alumni Program.
Former U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria, Walter Carrington, was a champion of civil liberties, democracy and closer ties between the U.S. and Nigeria. CYFI invites applications from fellows who are committed to putting the ideals of Walter Carrington into practice. The CYFI Board of Directors will select fellows who demonstrate the exceptional passion, skill, experience, strategic thinking and vision necessary to implement their own innovative and impactful projects.

 

Benefits

  • Implement concrete, youth-oriented solutions to issues that concern you
  • Access U.S. Government resources and contacts
  • Catch the attention of American and Nigerian leaders in the public and private sectors
  • Work alongside talented and motivated peers with diverse backgrounds, but similar visions
  • Participate in CYFI Alumni Program

 

Application Instructions

The 2014 application is open to all citizens and permanent residents of Nigeria currently residing in Lagos.

Criteria:

  • Passion
    You are committed to making a significant contribution to your community and country
  • Skill & Experience
    You have a unique set of skills and experiences that you can use to make an impact
  • Strategic Thinking
    You are excited about the opportunity to launch an innovative CYFI project.
    You know how to design a project that is based on sound research, uses resources creatively, builds or improves on existing systems, and leverages partnerships with complimentary organizations
  • Vision
    You know the area of social change in which you would like to work, and you can articulate the positive change that you would like to make

Application deadline: January 3rd, 2014

Click here to apply for the fellowship

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas - christmas Photo

Christmas is a time to celebrate with family and friends;as a member of the Afterschool Peer Mentoring Project family,we celebrate with you today!

Merry Christmas to you and yours! 

Happy Holidays!

Call for Applications: Global Essay competition on sustainable living

What does ‘sustainable living’ mean to you?

Global essay competition invites schoolchildren to outline their ideas for ‘sustainable living’ and the steps needed for societies to achieve them

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2013 prize winners at the Southern Hemisphere Schools Debate, Seychelles National Botanical Gardens, Victoria, Mahe (July 2013)

For the last quarter of a century, there has been much talk around the world about the need for ‘sustainable development’. But when it comes down to our own lives, what does ‘sustainable living’ actually mean?

We are inviting schoolchildren around the world to tell us what ’sustainable living’ means to them, and the steps which they believe their countries should be taking in order to achieve it. Whether it’s the food we eat, how we get around, where we work, what we buy, or some other dimension of how we live … ’sustainable living’ means different things to different people. As a child in your country, what does it mean to you?

The competition and debate are aimed at primary students (ages 7-11) and secondary students (ages 11-17) and their teachers in both formal and home schools. First, Second and Third Prizes will be awarded in both categories and one overall Grand Prize Winner (plus Teacher and Parent) will receive a free trip to the 2014 International Schools Debate in the UK (if the winner is from the UK, an alternative may be organised). All participating schools will be invited to participate in the International Schools Debate and related events in the UK during July 7-10, 2014.

Essay Competition

You are invited to write an essay in English, as follows:

Primary students (ages 7-11):What does ‘sustainable living’ mean to you? (max. 400 words)

Secondary students (ages 11-17): Outline your ideas for ‘sustainable living’ and the steps needed for societies to achieve them (max. 600 words)

A distinguished panel of judges, drawn from experts and educationalists in the field, will select three winning entries for each age category. The winning students will be awarded trophies at the International Schools Debate and their essays will be published on the competition website. Essays will be judged for comprehensiveness and clarity, innovative and creative thinking and the potential to contribute to a broad-ranging and constructive international debate (see scoring and judging criteria).

For each category, schools will be invited to submit up to 30 essays online. (Thesemust be submitted by the Teacher Champion, using the login details provided at registration. We regret that paper and emailed copies cannot be accepted.)

 

For more information: Click here

GE Africa launches first African Learning Advisory Board

GE Africa today launched the first African Learning Advisory Board in Nairobi, which will provide leadership and support for both GE Africa and the continent’s talent development.

The board was launched today by Adan Mohammed, cabinet secretary for industrialisation and enterprise development, and brings together approximately 20 members drawn from GE Africa, Europe and North America with a primary focus on local technical and engineering skills development across Africa.

Speaking during the launch, Jay Ireland, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of GE Africa, said the company has aggressive growth plans for the continent focused on local innovation, partnerships and investing in its local presence in the power, healthcare, rail transportation and oil and gas.

“This board is a first for GE and testament to our commitment to developing skilled talent for GE and Africa now and for the future,” he said.

“This is a partnership that leverages GE’s long history in training and skills development, homegrown knowledge and experience from African academia and the best in practice from across the globe,”

Mohammed said there is need for institutions to invest in skills development relevant to market needs.

“My ministry is fully aware of the vital role that technical skills will play in the future of this country especially as we venture into the world of extractive mining and gas exploration,” he said.

“The move by GE is a step in the right direction. As a government, we are committed to offer high quality education and technical training to our youth to enable us create more job opportunities and grow our economy.”

The Advisory Board is chaired by Professor Emmanuel Atoo Ajav, dean at the Faculty of Technology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

He said the composition of the board is largely from experts in Africa and this is a testimony that Africa is ready. “What we are doing is not only planting a seed, but also watering the tree root and nurturing its fruits,” he said.

Source – Human IPO

Call for Country Coordinators: International Youth Alliance on Family Planning

CrowdOutAIDS works with young people from all continents!

CrowdOutAIDS works with young people from all continents!

We are so excited to announce that we are now accepting applications for Country Coordinators to help us move the Alliance forward.

Country coordinators will:

  • Recruit national Alliance members and form a strategic direction for national teams for campaigns, advocacy and activities
  • Create and lead a national leadership team to materialize the short-term goals of the Alliance
  • Work closely and communicate regularly with the IYAFP Vice Chair of Country Coordinators

This is a volunteer role that will take 3-5 hours of commitment per week. If you are looking to sharpen your leadership skills, meet and collaborate with national and international partners, and are looking for a platform to support your development as a youth leader, then this role is for you!

Please fill out the application by January 10, 2014. Final selections will be made by the end of January. Applicants may be chosen for interviews.

Know someone who would be perfect for the position? Feel free to forward this post along!

 

For more information:

Call for applications:Global Health Corps Fellowship 2014-2015

ghc logo

Global Health Corps provides a yearlong paid fellowship for young professionals from diverse backgrounds to serve on the frontlines of the fight for global health equity at existing health organizations and government agencies. Fellows are currently working in Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Malawi, Zambia and the United States.

All Global Health Corps fellows are motivated, intelligent, and believe health is a human right. They come from diverse backgrounds, and vary in educational experience, professional expertise, and personal story. Whether they have a background in management, education, research, technology or another field, each fellow brings a unique perspective to their Placement Organization and the GHC community. Fellows have meaningful impact on their Placement Organization during the fellowship year, while developing leadership skills and relationships within a supportive community that will prepare them for deepened impact on global health over the course of their careers.

Global Health Corps Fellows are agents of change who: 

(A) Are committed to social justice: GHC leaders believe that all human beings deserve to be treated with dignity, and that healthcare is a human right. Fellows share a vision for a better world and are committed to creating transformative change.

(B) Collaborate: GHC leaders appreciate the interconnected roots of global health inequities, and seek opportunities to collaborate across disciplines and backgrounds in pursuit of social change.

(C) Inspire and mobilize others: GHC leaders can envision a just society and paint a compelling picture for others.  They communicate complex concepts clearly and seek opportunities to use their personal stories as tools to engage others in the movement for health equity

(D) Adapt and Innovate: Fellows can weather adversity and remain committed to their goals. They see challenges and uncertainty as opportunities to create new solutions to old problems.They think outside the box.

(E) Are self aware and committed to learning: Fellows understand that their development as leaders, practitioners and humans is a life-long process that requires humility, continual reflection and work.

(F) Get results: GHC leaders get things done! Actively working against a “business as usual” attitude, they improve the wellbeing of the world’s poor and vulnerable by empowering communities, organizations and governments to bring about positive change.

Criteria:

    • Be 30 or under at the start of the fellowship
    • Have an undergraduate university degree by July 2014
    • Be proficient in English

Application Timeline for the 2014-2015 Fellowship:

  • November 6, 2013: Part 1 of the application opens
  • December 6, 2013: Position descriptions posted online. Part 2 of the application opens
  • January 26, 2014: Applications close at 11:59pm EST
  • February – March 2014: Each application is reviewed by at least two readers
  • March 2014: up to 10 semi-finalists are selected for each fellowship position. All candidates are notified of their application status by email
  • March 2014: All semi-finalists are interviewed by Global Health Corps and 3-5 finalists per position are selected
  • March 2014-April 2014: All finalists are interviewed by the placement organizations
  • April-May 2014: Fellowship offers extended

Fellows come from a wide range of educational and professional backgrounds, as each individual fellowship position requires different specific skills. Make sure to check out their fellowship FAQs page.

Click here to apply

For more information:  Visit- http://ghcorps.org

#CAREER: How to Deal with a Job You Don’t Like

job

by JEREMY ANDERBERG

While in an ideal world, we’d all have our dream jobs at every period in our lives, the reality is that everyone will go through periods of not enjoying their work. Whether it’s right out of college and you just need to pay the bills, or you’re 20 years into a career and finally realizing it’s not for you, it’ll happen to all of us. If you’re unhappy with your current job, you should be making moves that will get you to a place and position you’d rather be. But in the meantime, you don’t have to approach each day as if it were the Bataan Death March. Below, I suggest some tips that will help you cope with a less-than-ideal job. In trying them, you may even find yourself enjoying and engaging more with your work.

First and foremost, you may need an attitude adjustment. Do you feel like you’re doing work that’s “beneath” you? Or perhaps you dislike your boss, so you’re sticking it to him by doing shoddy work. There’s a saying: “How you do anything is how you do everything.” If you’re not doing your best work, for whatever reason, it’s likely that other areas of your life aren’t getting your best work either. Good habits are formed in the things we don’t like to do, but do anyway because that’s how you become a reliable man. When you start trying your hardest to do the best work you can, you may come to enjoy your work more, because it’s almost certain that you’ll feel better about yourself and more fulfilled in what you’re doing.

Negotiate changes. An unhappy employee isn’t good for anyone. Believe it or not, your boss and coworkers don’t want you unhappy, because it affects the bottom line. You may have this sense that your boss is willfully making your life hell, and while that’s certainly possible, it’s not likely. It’s more likely that you have different personalities, or that they simply don’t know your frustrations.

Are you overworked? Underchallenged? Unhappy with the pay? One of your first steps should be to set up a meeting with your boss or supervisor and just be honest about how you feel in a professional and civil manner. Maybe you’re just bored at work because you aren’t being challenged enough, so you play computer games half the day. Ask for some more responsibility. Or maybe you have too much responsibility — while there are times where overtime is a necessary evil, it’s not sustainable. Be honest about the amount of work that you can handle. If you write off the possibility of negotiating changes at work, and just assume that your boss is tyrannical, you’re only adding to your problem.

Other things you can negotiate include working from home one day a week, being more flexible with hours (shifting your work day by an hour or two every once in a while), even requesting to transfer departments if you think your gifts and passions would be better suited elsewhere.

Set small goals for yourself. If you’re bored or not challenged at work, set small “quality” goals for yourself. At the end of each project, ask yourself, “Is the best work I can do?” If it’s not, get back to it. Make it a goal to finish a big project a day early. Or maybe you’ll come in under budget. You will not only attract the positive attention of those around you, but you’ll feel better about the work you’re doing.

Do one small act every day to get you to your dream job. If you’re unhappy at work, you probably have some idea of what you’d rather be doing. If you’re in a situation that can’t be remedied and you know that someday you’ll want to be doing something different, take one small step every day to get yourself to your dream job. Do you need to go back to school for something? Read about what the requirements may be, or even start working on an application for that program. If you dream about starting your own business, get one of the zillion books out there on the topic and read a chapter every day. If nothing else, take 15 minutes to jot down ideas and what next steps may be. Doing this will help you see that your current situation is temporary.

Think about what your current job can lead to. Related to the above is to think about the possibilities that your current job offers. Even if you don’t like it, and plan on moving on, it’s not a waste. No matter what, you’re getting experience doing something. How can that experience be leveraged for further opportunities? Before joining the AoM team last January, I was relatively unhappy with my job. But, I had a great schedule, which left me time to work on my freelance, which led to this job that I now love. So even though my previous job didn’t directly lead to this one, it afforded me the opportunity to get here.

Find something you enjoy at work. Unless you’re a complete Mr. Scrooge, there’s probably something you can find to enjoy about your workday. Cling to that. It gives you something to look forward to. Even if it’s just lunch, you can know that there’s one part of your day that’s enjoyable.

This concept can also apply to the work itself. Now there’s certain jobs where this may not be possible, but if you can, volunteer for a project you’d enjoy. If you’re in marketing, volunteer to do some social media or video projects. If you’re in sales, come up with a list of clients you’d really enjoy pitching to. If you can inject something you’ll enjoy into your work, you’ll find your day much easier (and more pleasant) to get through.

Give yourself something to look forward to at the end of the day or week. Along with giving yourself something to look forward to during work, do the same with the end of your day. Allow yourself some small reward after working. For me at my previous job, it was the chance to have 45 relatively quiet minutes on the bus with a book in hand. I relished that time, because for me, reading let me wind down from the stress of work. Grab a coffee from your favorite shop on your way home (or make a cup when you get home). Go out to eat on Friday night to celebrate making it through another week. Some small reward can make the worst of tasks manageable.

Gravitate to and collaborate with the people you like. Even if you don’t like your job, take the time to cultivate relationships with the people you like at your workplace. You don’t have to be best friends, buthaving a work buddy is important. If you can shoot the breeze over morning breaks or lunch time or even drinks after work, you’ll be a much happier fellow. Even better is if you can collaborate with them on projects — even if they’re in a different department. Be creative and find ways to make sure you aren’t going through the whole day utterly alone.

Decorate your space. This might sound like a superficial solution, but there’s been plenty of researchshowing just how much a workspace environment can affect your mood and level of job satisfaction. The first part of this entails being physically comfortable in your space and having the right equipment/materials to do your job. How is your chair? Your desk? Do you have enough room to do what you need to do? Do you have all the right software? If any of these things are an issue, bring it up. Again, it’s likely that your boss just doesn’t know it’s a problem.

The second part of this may be even more important, however, and that entails simply the pleasantness of the space. If you’re in a barren cubicle with gray walls and a gray desk and a gray computer, it can be pretty depressing. Put up a calendar that features your favorite hot rods, get some pictures of your family and friends up on your desk…find a way to make the space really yours. Even something as simple as seeing a smiling face in a photo can motivate you to do your best work and remind you who you’re doing the work for.

Be intentional about refreshing. We tend to think of work as just one aspect of our life. The reality, though, is that everything else we do affects our work. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, you’ll be extra cranky for that morning meeting. If you aren’t eating well and aren’t exercising, you’ll feel sluggish all day, which makes anything worse, let alone a full workday you already don’t enjoy.

Treat your work as holistically as you can. Eating well, exercising, and getting enough sleep will significantly increase your energy, and also your ability to take each new day by the horns.

In addition to that, make sure you get refreshed at work. Take a 15-minute break in the morning and afternoon. Take your full lunch break when you can; sometimes you won’t be able to, but you can even take charge of that every once in a while. Instead of sitting at your desk with your lunch, where you can be asked to work on something, take a walk outside for 30 minutes or bring a book to a coffee shop close by. Physically getting away (and being active) will refresh your brain for another few hours of work.

Have a sounding board/confidant. If you’re frustrated at work, keeping it bottled in will only make things worse. With your boss and coworkers, you need to professional and courteous in bringing up workplace problems. It’s also important, though, to just have someone you can vent to. Whether it’s a spouse, girlfriend, or college buddy, being able to say, “Ya know, today was a crappy day at work,” can ease your burden. This can be a little tricky, as you can’t really be public about it, and you definitely don’t want your sounding board to be a coworker, even if they’re a good friend. Also make sure to balance out work complaints with good things happening in your life. You don’t want your spouse or friends to be on the receiving end of constant negativity. While you certainly want to find the best in everything you do, it’s also okay and important to be honest about how you’re feeling at work.

Keep a gratitude journal. If you’re having a hard time finding those positives to balance out the negative, start keeping a gratitude journal. This can take a couple different forms. You could write out one thing each day that you’re thankful for about your job specifically. It can be something about the work itself, or something that’s a consequence of your work. For example, my being able to read on the bus before and after work each day was a definite point of gratitude. Not every job would have afforded that. I was also grateful for being fairly independent in my work, even if I didn’t love what I was doing. I’ll bet that you can find one thing each day you’re thankful for, even if it’s the same thing most days.

You can also do a gratitude journal that’s just for life in general. If you’re thankful for the truly important things in life — your health, your family, your home, the fact that you have a job at all — you’re more likely to see a crappy workday in a better light. Being more thankful all around will ensure that the things you don’t enjoy don’t take over your life.

While you likely won’t be able to implement all of these, working on a few of them will make your workday more tolerable, and perhaps you’ll come to even enjoy the work you’re doing. If nothing else, you’ll know that you’re doing the best work you can, and your character will thank you.

Source: The Art of Manliness

Call for Applications: The Climate Reality Project Training for Africans

The Climate Reality Project, an organization focused on creating a global movement to influence action on the climate crisis. On March 12-14 in Johannesburg, South Africa and will be hosting a training for new Climate Reality Leaders to help grow the movement, and invite you to apply.

The trainees will work with former US Vice President Al Gore to learn how to speak effectively about climate change to audiences of all kinds. Attendees will learn to communicate their personal story about climate change to engage audiences, learn scientific facts, network other influential people, and gain organizing and social media skills. The training will also focus on region specific issues including water and resource scarcity, issues surrounding land and agriculture, and the deployment of alternative energy options in Africa.

Key points about the training:

  • Climate Reality Leadership Trainings are completely self-funded by attendees.  There is no fee to attend the training, and you will need to pay for your own travel and lodging. During the training, The Climate Reality Project will provide all training materials.
  • All trainings are in English. If English is not your primary language, you will be required to do your own personal translation of materials during and after the training.
  • Climate Leaders commit to a minimum of ten (10) activities with The Climate Reality Project, including presentations, press and other events within a year after attending a training, and will be required to sign an agreement prior to the training.
  • If accepted, you must attend all three (3) days of the training and may be required to participate in other activities prior to your arrival.
  • Completing the training means you will be a member of the Climate Reality Leadership Corps and join our global network of Climate Reality Leaders.
  • A parent or legal guardian must accompany an accepted applicant who is under the age of 17 and both parties must be accepted in order attend the Climate Reality Leadership Training.

Deadline: February, 7th 2014

For more information: http://climaterealityproject.org/africa-training-application/